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Lessons learnt while spinning

In a recent project I worked on, I tried to minimize context switches by strategically replacing a critical section in our memory allocator by a custom spinlock that looked like this:

class SpinLock
{
    volatile tInt LockSem;

public:
    FORCEINLINE SpinLock()
    : LockSem(0)
    {}

    FORCEINLINE tBool Lock()
    {
        while(1)
        {
            // Atomically swap the lock variable with 1 if it's currently equal to 0
            if(!InterlockedCompareExchange(&LockSem, 1, 0))
            {
                // We successfully acquired the lock
                MemoryBarrier();
                return;
            }
        }
    }

    FORCEINLINE void Unlock()
    {
        MemoryBarrier();
        LockSem = 0;
    }
};

This indeed worked as predicted, but produced an unwanted side-effect on platforms without threads priority inversion (where a high-priority thread spins in a loop while waiting for a low-priority thread to release a lock) as the Xbox 360 (described in this technical article).

It created rare situations where the game was deadlocked, and the time spent to figure-out what was going on was quite high. At first, we played with threads priorities and affinities, but it had other unwanted side-effects. Another solution tried was to yield after a certain amount of spin loops, generating a context switch that let the OS reschedule threads correctly. In the end, we reverted to a critical section.

Lesson learnt? We have to be very careful when busy-waiting, especially on OSs that don’t have priority inversion protection mechanisms. Using the OS synchronization primitives is the best way of coordinating multiple threads. When locking becomes a performance bottleneck, we have to address the underlying problem (using lockless programming, etc).

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  1. March 8, 2012 at 8:46 am
  2. January 3, 2014 at 11:34 am
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